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David WishartWe try and keep an interesting mix of non-chill filtered whiskies and we are deeply indebted to David Wishart whose book Whisky Classified comes highly recommended and has allowed us to use his notes to add more detail to each whisky description. The book is available from behind the bar and you're welcome to have a look.  It details whisky from the perspective of flavour and not area, it also helps you choose a single malt whisky that suits your palate, not someone else's! Have a read and you'll understand the letters (in brackets) after each whisky from Tullibardine (A) to Ardbeg (J)!

The conventional way to classify Scotch malt whiskies is by region - Highland, Lowland, Speyside, Islay and Campbeltown. But knowing where they are made doesn't explain how they taste. Many distilleries today can produce a variety of flavours, peatiness (or lack of it) and this book guides the reader through the process.

How do you drink yours?  Everyone's preference differs, personally I choose to add a drop of water to release the esters that would otherwise never surface and so enjoy a fuller and flavoursome experience.  I wouldn't add ice as that clouds the taste buds and drinking a neat 46%abv+ whisky is not for me.  I'll not take issue with how you like yours though!  Steve

Port Charlotte (J) PDF Print E-mail
Reviews Whisky - Whisky - on now

Bruichladdich

Port Charlotte single malt, peated to a heavyweight 40PPM (parts peat per million), represents their ongoing exploration into the peat fired legacy of a great distillery, now silent. The Bruichladdich distillery have produced Port Charlotte Scottish Barley which is a cuvee crafted from altcasks hand-picked by master distiller Jim McEwan. It showcases the supreme elegance of this remarkable single malt - a union of the classic floral elegance of bruichladdich and heavy peat.

This whisky is testament to our belief that raw ingredients matter. Trickle distilled from 100% Scottish Barley the spirit gently matures in the lochside village of Port Charlotte before being bottled here at the distillery using Islay spring water.

Two miles south of Bruichladdich, (pronounced brook-laddie with the Gaelic meaning of shore-bank) hugging the shore of Loch Indaal, lies the village of Port Charlotte and ruins of Lochindaal Distillery, that ran spirit for 100 years between 1829 and 1929.

Following his visit here in 1885 Alfred Barnard wrote: "Peat only is used in drying the malt, fired in open chauffeurs", a testament supported in a few surviving faded photographs showing the huge peat stacks waiting to be fed to the kiln fires.

Their heavily peated Port Charlotte single malts are a tribute to the men who once worked this great, now silent, distillery and the skills and legacy they passed on.

Trickle distilled in their cathedral-like still house at Bruichladdich, the spirit is then matured in the original old stone warehouses in Port Charlotte. Living proof that peat can mean elegance.

Tasting from the team at Bruichladdich including Master Blender Jim McEwan at and around the Islay Distillery here.

Character: The texture is extraordinarily rich with a huge depth of character. The smouldering heat of peat fires pulls you into a whirlpool of islay flavours and aromas but with such finesse that you welcome the storm.

Colour: Gilded lily

Nose: Opening with assertive waves of peat smoke and Atlantic squall, the olfactory system is on high alert in anticipation of some major sensory excitement. A swell of aromatics flood the senses with notes of iodine, salty canvas, crushed sea shells, charred oak staves, black pepper, paprika and leather tobacco pouches. The second wave brings vanilla, figs and soft plump dates, marinated pear, freshly milled malt, dark sweet toffee and cracked walnuts. It’s smoky. It’s smouldering. It’s sensuous. Just close your eyes and inhale long and deep. This is aromatic awesomeness.
Palate:
Wow! Waves of the sweetest, smoothest, warmest smokiest spirit that you have ever experienced flood onto the palate like the atlantic surf on Saligo Bay. It is potent, focused and the flavours explode brilliantly onto the palate. Full of depth and complexity, the smokey sweetness of the barley contrasts beautifully with the marine freshness of the spirit and the richness of toffee and vanilla. The complexity is enhanced further with a citrus twist and then mellow oak tempers the fire. Once the taste buds adjust to what is happening, they rejoice in the company and pleasure of this young Celt.
Finish:
It’s long and heart-warming, arousing feelings of pride and passion. It brings courage and strength, honesty and faith to your very soul

Click READ MORE for our tasting notes...

The following tasting notes by Steve Marquis...

Bruichladdich Port Charlotte

Cluster J

Bottled By: Producer

Region: Islay

Distillery: Bruichladdich

Age: Multi-vintage, no age statement (but we hear it's six years old).

Strength: 46% vol

Colour: Pale golden amber

Chill Filtered: No

Cask: First fill American Oak (Bourbon) and a small amount of sherrywood.

Nose: Fragrant, fruity and youthful, lemon and pepper aromas, a salty seashore tang, hint of seaweed and a huge wack of peaty of smoke.

Taste: Medium-bodied, surprisingly sweet, full peat-smoke, malty, citrus, peppery spice and vanilla oak notes.

Finish: Long, rich peat-smoke, licorice, salt and pepper at the end.

Steve Marquis
16/5/2015

Flavour

Intensity
Body bellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpg
Sweetness bellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpg
Smoky bellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpg
Medicinal bellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpg
Tobacco bellcolourtiny.jpg 
Honey bellcolourtiny.jpg
Spicy bellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpg
Winey
Nutty bellcolourtiny.jpg
Malty bellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpg
Fruity bellcolourtiny.jpgbellcolourtiny.jpg
Floral bellcolourtiny.jpg
From Whisky Classified
& Whisky Analyst

Bruichladdich is a fiercely independent Islay distillery, and is managed by one of the whisky worlds best known characters - Jim McEwan. On the west side of Loch Indaal, facing Bowmore, the distillery has had a chequered history. Closed in 1993 and then worked for just six weeks in 1998, it wasn't until 2001 that distilling restarted seriously when it was reopened by the new owners, Bruichladdich Distillery Company. Originally it produced peaty Islay malts then in the 1960's it switched to an unpeated style, and the malt kiln was dismantled (it is hoped that this will be re instated in the passage of time, as will a Lomond still). Bruichladdich now produce whisky with a variety of peating levels and styles in their own inimitable way. The distillery is Islay's largest employer.

 

keyDavid Wishart's book Whisky Classified details whisky from the perspective of flavour and not area, it also helps you choose a single malt whisky that suits your palate, not someone else's! 

The conventional way to classify Scotch malt whiskies is by region - Highland, Lowland, Speyside, Islay and Campbeltown. But knowing where they are made doesn't explain how they taste. Many distilleries today can produce a variety of flavours, peatiness (or lack of it) and this book guides the reader through the process.  The following is a key to the cluster groups used within the book and on our website.  If you lookup your own favourite whisky in th ebook and find what cluster it is in you are bound to find some equally enjoyable whiskies in the same and adjacent clusters that will suit your palate.  Here is a summary of the clusters...

A - Full bodied, sweet, pronounced sherry with fruity, honey and spicy notes.
B - Full bodied, sweet, pronounced sherry with fruity, floral and malty notes, some honey and spice evident.
C - Full bodied, medium sweet, pronounced sherry with fruity, honey, nutty and smoky notes.
D - Quite full bodied and sweet, fruity, floral and nutty notes, fairly spicy, hint of smoke.honey and spicy notes.
E - Medium bodied, medium sweet with fruity, honey and winey notes, and a whiff of smoke and spice.
F - Quite full bodied, sweet and malty with fruity, spicy and smoky notes.
G - Light, sweet and honeyed, with floral, fruity and spicy notes, mostly unpeated, an aperitif style.
H - Very light, sweet and malty, fruity and floral, an aperitif style.
I - Medium bodied, medium sweet, quite smoky, some medicinal notes, spicy, fruity and nutty.
J - Full bodied, dry, pungent with peat smoke and medicinal notes, some spice, malt and fruit in the background and a hint of polished leather or libraries.

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